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SIRT6: A Promising Target for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

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Anticancer Genes

Part of the book series: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ((AEMB,volume 818))

Abstract

Many of the pathologies associated with the aging process also contribute to tumor initiation, growth or metastasis. Insights from biogerontology may be instrumental for developing new therapies for cancer. This chapter highlights the rationale for combining biogerontology and cancer research to generate new strategies for cancer treatment. In particular, this chapter focuses on one gene, SIRT6, which has emerged as an important regulator of longevity in mammals and appears to have multiple biochemical functions, which antagonize tumor development and may be useful in cancer prevention and treatment.

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Acknowledgements

This work was funded by NIH grants to MVM and VG, and Life Extension Foundation grants to VG and AS. The authors would like to thank Sean Kelly, Mehr Kashyap and Xiao Tian for their assistance in writing and discussing the content of this manuscript.

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Correspondence to Andrei Seluanov .

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Van Meter, M., Gorbunova, V., Seluanov, A. (2014). SIRT6: A Promising Target for Cancer Prevention and Therapy. In: Grimm, S. (eds) Anticancer Genes. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 818. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6458-6_9

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