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Dynamics of Manipulators on a Fixed Base

  • Pål Johan From
  • Jan Tommy Gravdahl
  • Kristin Ytterstad Pettersen
Part of the Advances in Industrial Control book series (AIC)

Abstract

Manipulator dynamics tells us how the manipulator responds to joint torques and external forces. Each joint is normally equipped with an actuator which generates either linear forces or torques in the direction or around a fixed axis. The relatively simple joint torques and forces applied at each joint result in a complex overall motion of the robotic manipulator. One of the most important questions in robotics is thus how to find the joint torques that give the desired robot motion.

In this chapter we present the dynamic equations of a robotic manipulator in a well-defined but simple way. The chapter can be used in an introductory course to robotics and will give the reader a good understanding of how to model manipulator arms. Furthermore, as the formulation is based on the mathematically rigid formulations presented in the previous chapters, this chapter may also be interesting for readers already familiar with robotics and would like a mathematically more robust treatment than the one normally found in textbooks on robotics.

Keywords

Multibody System Joint Torque Robotic Manipulator Inertia Matrix Previous Chapter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pål Johan From
    • 1
  • Jan Tommy Gravdahl
    • 2
  • Kristin Ytterstad Pettersen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mathematical Sciences and TechnologyNorwegian University of Life SciencesÅsNorway
  2. 2.Department of Engineering CyberneticsNorwegian Univ. of Science & TechnologyTrondheimNorway

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