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The UK Electricity System and Its Resilience

  • Sara L. Walker
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Energy book series (LNEN, volume 16)

Abstract

Purpose

Security of supply is a relatively outdated concept for the twenty-first-century electricity systems in a low-carbon future. Resilience is proposed as an alternative, and application of the term to the UK electricity system is discussed.

Approach

Security of supply within the context of the UK electricity system is described. Key pressures on the UK electricity system to develop towards a low-carbon future are explained, and a justification is made that security of supply should be replaced with the concept of resilience. Resilience is described, along with technology transitions.

Findings

It is proposed that resilience as a concept offers greater flexibility to represent a changing concept of acceptable performance for an electricity system. Additionally, resilience as a concept incorporates all scales, from macro-level socioeconomic landscape to micro-level local issues.

Practical Implications

Further research is needed to provide a practical framework within which resilience of an electricity system can be described. This framework does not lend itself to a single indicator of resilience and the framework is likely to comprise qualitative as well as quantitative aspects.

Keywords

Electricity system Security of supply Resilience 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of the Built and Natural EnvironmentNorthumbria UniversityNewcastleUK

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