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Study of Cancer Diagnosis Based on Families Attitudes’ Analysis

  • Yuqian Sun
  • Bingfu Sun
  • Xiaomei Li
  • Ruihua Liu
  • Jia Zhao
  • Yingna Wen
  • Jing Hao
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 217)

Abstract

Objective To investigate the proportion of Chinese families’ preference for cancer disclosure and explore the variables associated with their preference. Methods Family members who had a relative with recently diagnosed cancer were interviewed. Among 220 eligible family members, 194 answered a questionnaire and stated whether or not they preferred the diagnosis to be disclosed. Results It was estimated that 57.7 % of family members preferred no-disclosure and 42.3 % favored informing. Families’ perceptions of telling the truth to patient were the most critical factors contributing to their preferences (OR = 0.160, P < 0.01). Important involved others’ opinions and practices also were associated with families’ preferences (OR = 0.338, P < 0.05). Conclusions Family members’ preferences for nondisclosure of cancer diagnosis were relatively strong in mainland China. Family members’ perceived values and meanings of cancer disclosure were major determinants of their preferences. Physicians’ increased communications with families about reasons for telling the cancer patient would change families’ opposing minds.

Keywords

Cancer care Diagnosis disclosure Family 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuqian Sun
    • 1
  • Bingfu Sun
    • 2
  • Xiaomei Li
    • 2
  • Ruihua Liu
    • 1
  • Jia Zhao
    • 1
  • Yingna Wen
    • 1
  • Jing Hao
    • 1
  1. 1.Nursing and Rehabilitation College of Hebei United UniversityTangshan cityPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Affiliated Hospital of Hebei United UniversityTangshan cityPeople’s Republic of China

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