Prognosis of Hyperuricemia in Patients with Acute Cerebral Infraction

  • Yanbo Peng
  • Xin Xiong
  • Yu Su
  • Zhuo Wang
  • Jingyue Wang
  • Xiaojing Zhao
  • Dali Wang
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 204)

Abstract

Background The prognostic significance of uric acid (UA) levels in acute ischemic stroke is unclear, so the objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the uric acid and the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 2,128) presenting with acute ischemic stroke (≤72 h) were included in the study. We determined the association of uric acid level with at discharge (alive at discharge, good outcome; dead or living in care, poor outcome). Demographics, history of past illness, and laboratory markers, were analyzed in both outcome groups with the use of multivariate logistic regression. Results We measured serum urate in 2,128 patients. Elevated urate level predicted a lower chance of good outcome at discharge (odds ratio, 1.25 per additional 0.1 mmol/L; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.66–3.05) independently of other prognostic factors. Higher urate levels have a greater effect on outcome in the presence of hypertriglyceridemia (additional relative hazard, 2.57 per additional 0.1 mmol/L; 95 % CI, 1.88–s6.77). Conclusions Hyperuricemia is independently associated with an increased risk of outcome in acute ischemic stroke.

Keywords

Cerebral Infraction Hyperuricemia Prognosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yanbo Peng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Xiong
    • 1
  • Yu Su
    • 3
  • Zhuo Wang
    • 1
  • Jingyue Wang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Xiaojing Zhao
    • 1
  • Dali Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyAffiliated Hospital of Hebei United UniversityTangshanChina
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologySchool of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow UniversitySuzhouChina
  3. 3.Human resources departmentHebei United UniversityTangshanChina
  4. 4.International education centerHebei United UniversityTangshanChina

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