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Research on Human Hematopoietic Function by Medical Ray at Different Doses Management

  • Xiangke Cao
  • Qingzeng Qian
  • Fuhai Shen
  • Qian Wang
  • Junwang Tong
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 204)

Abstract

This research is based on medical ray at different doses management on human hematopoietic function influence. Observation group is 97 medical staff in one hospital at different areas of contact ray, who are divided into diagnostic radiology group, interventional radiology group, clinical nuclear medicine group and radiation therapy group. Control group is 32 medical staff in the hospital, who does not contact rays. Blood indexes of men in observation group except RBC are slightly smaller than women. Blood indexes in observation group are slightly smaller than control group. People in <10 group, 10-group, 20-group contact medical ray dose are significantly higher than control group. Blood indexes of people in <10 group, 10-group, 20-group except RBC are slightly smaller than control group. White cell injury is most obvious. Contact ray dose more injury. Contact ray injury longer.

Keywords

Medical radiation Dose equivalent Hematopoietic function 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangke Cao
    • 1
  • Qingzeng Qian
    • 2
  • Fuhai Shen
    • 2
  • Qian Wang
    • 2
  • Junwang Tong
    • 2
  1. 1.Central laboratory for college of Life SciencesHebei United UniversityTang ShanChina
  2. 2.Central laboratory for college of public healthHebei United UniversityTang ShanChina

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