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Context and Value of Biomedical and Health Informatics

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Abstract

Public health informatics (PHI) is one branch of the larger field of biomedical and health informatics (BMHI) (Hersh, BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 9:24, 2009). In this chapter, we will define the terminology of BMHI and identify where other branches of the field can inform the science and practice of PHI. We will also discuss the value of BMHI in all health-related disciplines.

Keywords

  • Teleradiology
  • Telepathology
  • eHealth
  • Informatics
  • Biomedical informatics
  • Health informatics
  • Imaging
  • Consumer health
  • Translational research
  • Health information management
  • Management information systems
  • Electronic medical record
  • Electronic health record
  • Personal health record
  • Health information exchange
  • Secondary use
  • Telemedicine
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Clinical epidemiology
  • Comparative effectiveness research

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Fig. 3.1
Fig. 3.2

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Correspondence to William R. Hersh MD .

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Hersh, W.R. (2014). Context and Value of Biomedical and Health Informatics. In: Magnuson, J., Fu, Jr., P. (eds) Public Health Informatics and Information Systems. Health Informatics. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-4237-9_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-4237-9_3

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