Data Support for Electronic Medicines Management

  • Stephen Goundrey-Smith
Chapter
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

It is clear from the operational requirements of EP systems that these systems require high quality data inputs from a number of sources. The supporting data for EP systems and other medication management systems fall into four main categories:

Keywords

Aspirin Warfarin Alginate Digoxin Paracetamol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Goundrey-Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Cert Clin Pharm, MRPharmSSGS PharmaSolutionsChedworthUK

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