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Data Support for Electronic Medicines Management

  • Stephen Goundrey-Smith
Chapter
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

It is clear from the operational requirements of EP systems that these systems require high quality data inputs from a number of sources. The supporting data for EP systems and other medication management systems fall into four main categories:

Keywords

Total Parenteral Nutrition British National Formulary Read Code Software Vendor Medicine Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Goundrey-Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Cert Clin Pharm, MRPharmSSGS PharmaSolutionsChedworthUK

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