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Solar Sailing pp 171-228 | Cite as

Non-Keplerian orbits

  • Colin Robert McInnes
Part of the Astronomy and Planetary Sciences book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

When designing future missions, the engineer’s imagination is limited by inevitable real-world constraints. For example, the propulsion system to be used will have a given specific impulse and so, for a finite propellant mass, will provide some total Δv. In addition, to achieve the desired mission goals a trajectory will be designed which fits within the envelope of the Δv; available from the propulsion system. For solar sails, however, the propulsion system has in principle infinite specific impulse, freeing the engineer to consider new means of attaining mission goals. Furthermore, with high-performance solar sails, a potentially infinite specific impulse is combined with an acceleration of the same order as the local solar gravitational acceleration. With such tools at their disposal, engineers can consider novel forms of orbital acrobatics, again allowing new means of attaining mission goals.

Keywords

Equilibrium Solution Ecliptic Plane Solar Radiation Pressure Lagrange Point Halo Orbit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

Sun-centred non-Keplerian orbits

  1. McInnes, CR. & Simmons, J.F.L., ‘Halo Orbits for Solar Sails — Dynamics and Applications’, European Space Agency Journal, 13, 3, 229–234, 1989.Google Scholar
  2. McInnes, C.R., ‘Advanced Trajectories for Solar Sail Spacecraft’, PhD Thesis, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, October 1991.Google Scholar
  3. McInnes, C.R. & Simmons, J.F.L., ‘Halo Orbits for Solar Sails I — Heliocentric Case’, Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, 29, 4, 466–471, 1992.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Molostov, A.A. & Shvartsburg, A.A., ‘Heliocentric Halos for a Solar Sail with Absorption’, Soviet Physics Doklady, 37, 3, 149–152, 1992.ADSGoogle Scholar
  5. Moiostov, A.A. & Shvartsburg, A.A., ‘Heliocentric Synchronous Halos for a Solar Sail with Absorption’, Soviet Physics Doklady, 37, 4, 195–197, 1992.ADSGoogle Scholar
  6. Mashkevich, S.V. & Shvartsburg, A.A., ‘“Best” Solar Sail for Heliocentric Halos’, Soviet Physics Doklady, 37, 6, 290–293, 1992.Google Scholar

Planet-centred non-Keplerian orbits

  1. McInnes, C.R. & Simmons, J.F.L., ‘Halo Orbits for Solar Sails II — Geocentric Case’, Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, 29, 4, 472–479, 1992.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Shvartsburg, A.A., ‘Geocentric Halos for a Solar Sail with Absorption’, Soviet Physics Doklady, 38, 2, 85–88, 1993.Google Scholar
  3. Glotova, M.Y. & Shvartsburg, A.A., ‘Geocentric Synchronous Halos for a Solar Sail’, Soviet Physics Doklady, 38, 12, 449–501, 1993.Google Scholar

Artificial Lagrange points

  1. McInnes, C.R.,’ solar Sail Halo Trajectories: Dynamics and Applications’, IAF-91-334, 42nd International Astronautical Congress, Montreal, October, 1991.Google Scholar
  2. McInnes, C.R., ‘Solar Sail Trajectories at the Lunar L2 Lagrange Point’, Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, 30, 6, 782–784, 1993.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. McInnes, C.R., McDonald, A.J.C., Simmons, J.F.L. & MacDonald, E.W., ‘Solar Sail Parking in Restricted Three-Body Systems’, Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, 17, 2, 399–406, 1994.ADSzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Robert McInnes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowScotland

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