Overview of Venous Disorders

  • John J. Bergan
  • Steven Sparks

Abstract

The term venous disorders implies that normal functioning is deranged. To understand the various venous disorders, it is necessary to start with an understanding of the normal anatomy. The venous system of the lower extremities can be divided, for purposes of understanding, into three systems: the deep venous system, the superficial venous system, and the connecting veins which are called perforating veins. The principal return of blood flow from the lower extremities is through the deep veins. In the calf, the deep veins are paired and named for the accompanying arteries. Therefore, the anterior tibial, posterior tibial, and peroneal artery are accompanied by their paired veins which are interconnected. These join to form the popliteal vein which may also be paired. As the popliteal vein ascends, it becomes the superficial femoral vein, which is best called the femoral vein.

Keywords

Obesity Catheter Heparin Pancreatitis Warfarin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Bergan
  • Steven Sparks

There are no affiliations available

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