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Concurrent Data Manipulation in a Pure Functional Language

  • Phil Trinder
Conference paper
Part of the Workshops in Computing book series (WORKSHOPS COMP.)

Abstract

This paper investigates the feasibility of using a pure functional language to implement data storage and manipulation on parallel declarative machines. A pure functional language is used to construct a data manager that allows efficient and concurrent access to shared data. The interaction between concurrent data manipulation operations is investigated. It is shown that, within certain limits, the rate of processing data manipulating operations is independent of the size of the data structure.

Keywords

Active Task Graph Node Transaction Processing Primary Memory Disk Access 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phil Trinder
    • 1
  1. 1.Glasgow UniversityUK

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