Synthesis of schematic descriptions in mechanical design

  • Karl T. Ulrich
  • Warren P. Seering
Chapter

Abstract

This article describes a schematic synthesis problem and one of its solution techniques. The problem domain consists of devices that can be described as networks of lumped-parameter, idealised elements in the translational-mechanical, rotational-mechanical, fluid-mechanical, and electrical media. Such devices include speedometers, accelerometers, pneumatic cylinders, and pressure gauges. Design problems in this domain are specified by an input quantity, an output quantity, and the desired relationship between the input and output. The solution technique is based on three steps: (1) generate a candidate design, (2) derive and classify the behaviour of the candidate, (3) based on the derived behaviour and domain knowledge, modify the candidate (if possible) to bring it in line with the specification. The key idea behind this technique is that an abstract characterisation of the essential properties of the candidate design expedites the analysis and modification. The results of this work are aimed at computer tools for preliminary mechanical design.

Keywords

Torque Fractionation Candida Coupler Doyle 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Ulrich KT, Seering WP. Function sharing in mechanical design. In: Proceedings of the Seventh National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-88), St. Paul, MN, August 1988.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Ulrich KT, Seering WP. Computation and preparametric design. MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report 1043, October 1988.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Ogata K. Modern control engineering. Prentice-Hall, 1970; 284.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Prabhu D, Taylor DL. Some issues in the generation of topology of systems with constant power-flow input-output requirements. In: Proceedings of the 1988 ASME Design Automation Conference, Kissimmee, FL, September 1988.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Doyle RJ. Hypothesizing device mechanisms: opening up the black box. Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1988.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Kannapan S, Marshek KM. Design synthetic reasoning: a program for research. Mechanical Systems and Design Technical Report 202, University of Texas at Austin, Department of Mechanical Engineering.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Williams B. Principled design based on topologies of interaction. Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1988.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Roylance G. A simple model of circuit design. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report 703, 1983.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Ressler AL. A circuit grammar for operational amplifier design. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report 807, January 1984.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Rieger C, Grinberg M. The declarative representation and procedural simulation of causality in physical mechanisms. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, vol. 1, 1977; 250.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Paynter HM. Analysis and design of engineering systems. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press, 1961.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Rosenberg RC, Karnopp DC. Introduction to physical system dynamics. McGraw-Hill, 1983.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl T. Ulrich
  • Warren P. Seering

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations