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Ethics of Transplantation

  • R. Randal Bollinger
Chapter
Part of the Springer Specialist Surgery Series book series (SPECIALIST)

Abstract

An anencephalic infant is born in North America, an HIV positive adult is declared brain dead in Africa, a convicted murderer is executed by gun shot to the head in Asia, an impoverished farmer offers to sell his kidney on the Indian subcontinent and a comatose stroke victim has life support withdrawn in Europe. Which of these is an acceptable organ donor and which of the hundreds of thousands of persons in the world with organ failure awaiting transplants should receive their organs? These are among the practical ethical issues of modern transplantation.

Keywords

Ethical Issue Organ Donation Brain Death Human Organ Warm Ischemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Randal Bollinger

There are no affiliations available

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