Other Placental Proteins

  • Tim Chard
  • Arnold Klopper

Abstract

In the last decade several new proteins of placental origin have been discovered in the maternal circulation. Their concentration increases during gestation pari passu with placental growth in much the same way as hPL. As their physiological role is unknown they cannot be classed as hormones. This is largely a matter of how a hormone is defined; in the broadest sense some of them may prove to be hormones. From the point of view of placental function tests, this is irrelevant: their rising concentration may reflect placental growth and function and that is our sole concern.

Keywords

Filtration Carbohydrate Polyethylene Glycol Heparin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Chard
    • 1
  • Arnold Klopper
    • 2
  1. 1.St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College and the London Hospital Medical CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyRoyal InfirmaryAberdeenUK

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