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Microbiological Aspects of Frozen Foods

  • M. H. Brown
Part of the Springer Series in Applied Biology book series (SSAPPL.BIOLOGY)

Abstract

At first sight the microbiology of frozen foods is not a very promising topic, as it is well known that frozen temperatures halt microbial growth. However, the mechanism of action and the effects of freezing and thawing on microbial death, sub-lethal injury and the recovery of microorganisms from frozen foods have been extensively investigated because of their practical importance. More recently the techniques of mathematical modelling have been used to predict times for temperature equilibration and microbial growth in food products during freezing and equilibration to frozen conditions. This approach, which is in its early days, represents an important advance in being able to predict the behaviour of microbes during frozen processing (Castell-Perez et al. 1989).

Keywords

Freezing Point Quality Change Freeze Storage Osmotic Dehydration Freezing Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. Brown

There are no affiliations available

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