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A Conceptual Framework for Error Analysis in SQL Interfaces

  • G. N. Paulley
  • W. B. Cowan
Conference paper
Part of the Workshops in Computing book series (WORKSHOPS COMP.)

Abstract

SQL, a formal, non-procedural query language has become ubiquitous despite the demonstration of a variety of shortcomings. The inadequacies of database query languages like SQL reveal themselves by frequent errors in query formulation. Existing studies of query error tend to focus on specific types of error, or particular circumstances under which errors occur. Query formulation models constructed to analyse interaction behavior utilise incomplete models of the user. This paper introduces a framework powerful enough to analyse and respond to virtually all erroneous queries in a systematic way. The framework aids in understanding errors described in previous empirical studies, but also provides a basis for future research.

Keywords

Discount Rate Query Language Error Response Integrity Constraint Error Message 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© British Computer Society 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Paulley
    • 1
  • W. B. Cowan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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