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AID and Adoption

  • A. A. Templeton
  • J. Triseliotis
Part of the Clinical Practice in Urology book series (PRACTICE UROLOG)

Abstract

One purpose of this book is to encourage a rational approach to the treatment of male infertility but despite advances in the understanding of male reproductive physiology, the fact is that many will be fortunate if they ever father a child. Realisation of this truth among physicians and also the increasing public acceptance of artificial insemination by donor (AID) has led to a dramatic increase in demand for this treatment. In the Infertility Clinic, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, there is a waiting list of one year and only 30% of the patients accepted into the AID programme actually reside in Edinburgh. Many patients have to travel long distances for treatment and the stress involved must take its toll on their quality of life and also on their chance of conceiving. While several centres run small clinics often using fresh semen, the establishment of larger AID clinics is often thwarted by difficulties relating to the recruitment of suitable donors, the introduction of semen cryostorage and the development of precise methods of timing insemination.

Keywords

Male Infertility Artificial Insemination Adoptive Parent Infertile Couple Child Care Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Templeton
  • J. Triseliotis

There are no affiliations available

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