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Legal Aspects of Safety, Health and Welfare on the United Kingdom Continental Shelf

  • A. J. Higginson

Abstract

In this chapter it is proposed to consider the laws relating to safety, health and welfare on the continental shelf of the United Kingdom. The particular legislation is considered briefly later, as well as liability insurance for employers. However before reviewing such legislation, and to appreciate its evolution, it is important to note how international law has come to recognise the jurisdictional claims of coastal states over the waters of their continental shelf, long regarded as the High Seas, in what is now known as the Continental Shelf Doctrine.

Keywords

Continental Shelf Geneva Convention Liability Insurance Royal Decree Submarine Pipeline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Higginson

There are no affiliations available

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