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Design of POMP — a Persistent Object Management Processor

  • W. P. Cockshott
Conference paper
Part of the Workshops in Computing book series (WORKSHOPS COMP.)

Abstract

Pomp is a single board persistent object management processor designed to fit into a Sun Computer. When attached to a SUN Vme Bus computer it will allow that machine to create and manipulate a graph of persistent objects. These objects will exist over the lifetime of the hardware, and beyond that provided that other machines capable of reading the archive media exist

Although the design is for a SUN computer, with minor modifications similar machines could be fitted to the buses of other computers.

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Copyright information

© British Computer Society 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. P. Cockshott
    • 1
  1. 1.University of StrathclydeUK

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