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Urodynamics of the Multicalyceal Upper Urinary Tract

  • C. E. Constantinou
  • J. C. Djurhuus

Abstract

The upper urinary tract consists of the calyces, renal pelvis and ureters, all of which are involved in the active transport of urine away from the kidney towards the bladder. Clearly, before the mechanism of urine transport in this system can be understood, the contribution made by each of the component parts must be defined.

Keywords

Renal Pelvis Urine Flow Rate Bolus Volume Acute Obstruction Baseline Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. Constantinou
  • J. C. Djurhuus

There are no affiliations available

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