Security

  • Michael Chesher
  • Rukesh Kaura
Part of the Practitioner Series book series (PRACT.SER.)

Abstract

Around 2000 BC the Egyptians developed what was perhaps the first key operated lock mechanism. This device consisted of a solid beam, carved from hardwood and hollowed from the end to create a slot. When locked, this beam was prevented from moving by the means of pegs in a staple, that were attached to the hollowed beam. Unlocking the lock required a key, typically a foot in length or more. This ancient design evolved into its modern day equivalent known as the tumbler lock, still using fundamentally the same technology. The only major difference is simply the size.

Keywords

Retina Assure Boiling Triad Arena 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Chesher
    • 1
  • Rukesh Kaura
    • 2
  1. 1.Kingston Business SchoolKingston UniversityUK
  2. 2.Chase Investment Bank LtdLondonUK

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