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The Patient with Fecal Incontinence

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Abstract

Normally, the rectum is empty, containing only mucus and small amounts of fecal fluid. The anus is held closed at rest by the internal sphincter. Formed stool is usually stored in the sigmoid colon. A stimulus, such as food entering the stomach (gastrocolic reflex), initiates peristalsis in the colon, pushing stool into the rectum. The internal sphincter relaxes (anorectal inhibitory reflex) allowing the stool to be sampled at the level of the pelvic floor. If appropriate, the stool will pass; if not, the external sphincter will squeeze tight, maintaining continence.

Keywords

  • Fecal Incontinence
  • Anorectal Inhibitory Reflex
  • Gastrocolic Reflex
  • Fecal Fluid
  • Specific Pelvic Floor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2013 Springer-Verlag London

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Stewart, P., Rex, J., Stewart, P. (2013). The Patient with Fecal Incontinence. In: Chan, L., Tse, V. (eds) Multidisciplinary Care of Urinary Incontinence. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2772-7_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2772-7_8

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4471-2771-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4471-2772-7

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