Implementing Postgraduate Education

Discussion points
  • John Hasler

Abstract

Postgraduate education depends heavily on money, time and geography. For instance, in the UK there are large resources for vocational training but few for undergraduate or CME, which is reflected in the highly developed and structured vocational training course: in Scandinavia money for vocational training is less, but often time is more available for junior hospital doctors working only 40 hours a week and one night. Geography can be a major problem, the length of Norway is greater than the distance from Oslo to Rome.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Hasler

There are no affiliations available

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