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Models of Brain Processing with Respect to Functional Neuroimaging

  • Mark S. George
  • Howard A. Ring
  • Durval C. Costa
  • Peter J. Ell
  • Kypros Kouris
  • Peter H. Jarritt
Chapter

Abstract

The cerebral cortex contains approximately 1014 synapses (von der Malsburg and Singer 1988). Current neuroimaging techniques can only resolve brain regions containing millions of cells. Hence it is always the coordinated functioning of millions of synapses and neurons that generate measurable activity. A single neuron cannot alone accomplish the processing from which complex behaviours emerge. Thus, in attempting to understand the neuronal basis of complex behaviour it is essential to have a theoretical model of the interactions of large groups of functional units. This not only makes data management convenient; it also in some way represents biological reality.

Keywords

Complex Behaviour Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Functional NEUROIMAGING Brain Processing Cerebral Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark S. George
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard A. Ring
    • 3
  • Durval C. Costa
    • 4
  • Peter J. Ell
    • 5
  • Kypros Kouris
    • 6
    • 7
  • Peter H. Jarritt
    • 8
  1. 1.Raymond Way Neuropsychiatry Research Group, Department of Clinical NeurologyInstitute of NeurologyLondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  3. 3.Raymond Way Neuropsychiatry Research Group, Department of Clinical NeurologyInstitute of NeurologyLondonEngland
  4. 4.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUniversity College and Middlesex School of Medicine (UCMSM)LondonEngland
  5. 5.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUniversity College and Middlesex School of Medicine (UCMSM)LondonEngland
  6. 6.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUniversity College and Middlesex School of Medicine (UCMSM)LondonEngland
  7. 7.University of KuwaitKuwait CityKuwait
  8. 8.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUniversity College and Middlesex School of Medicine (UCMSM)LondonEngland

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