General Introduction to the Clinical Features of Malignant Brain Tumours

  • M. F. Pell
  • D. G. T. Thomas

Abstract

The incidence of primary brain tumours is difficult to assess accurately as the frequency of different tumour types depends on the source of the series which is analysed, but ranges from 4.2 per 100 000 to 12.8 per 100 000 (Brewis et al., 1966; Liebowitz and Atler, 1969). Of these, approximately 30% are astrocytomas (Percy et al. 1972).

Keywords

Depression Adenoma Dementia Neurol Triad 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bailey P, Buchanan DN, Bucy PC (1948) Intracranial Tumours of Infancy and Childhood, 2nd edn. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  2. Battistella PA, Ruffille R, Viero F, Benelagli B, Condini A (1990) Brain tumours: classification and clinical aspects. Pediatr Med Chir 12: 33–39PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Brewis M, Poskanzer DC, Rolland C, Miller H (1966) Neurological disease in an English city. Acta Neurol Scand 42: 1PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Bingley T (1958) Mental symptoms in TLE and in temporal lobe gliomas. Acta Psychiat Scand, Suppl 120Google Scholar
  5. Cascino GD (1990) Epilepsy and brain tumours: implications for treatment. Epilepsia 31,Suppl 3: 537–544Google Scholar
  6. Frankel SA, German WJ (1958) Glioblastoma multiforme — a review of 219 cases with regard to natural history, pathology, diagnostic methods and treatment. J Neurosurg 15: 489PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Henry C, Despland PA, Regli F (1990) Initial epileptic crisis after the age of 60: aetiology, clinical aspect and EEG. Schweiz Med Wochenschr 120: 787–792Google Scholar
  8. Hess R (1970) Die epileptogenen Hirntumoren. Mod Probl Pharmacopsych 4: 200Google Scholar
  9. Jahz D (1969) Die Epilepsien. Georg Thiem, StuggartGoogle Scholar
  10. Ketz E (1968) Zum Klinischen Aspekt der Psychomotorischen Epilepsie Dr Alfred Huthig, HeidelbergGoogle Scholar
  11. Ketz E, Xanthakos D (1969) Die Bedeutung epileptischer Anfalle dei schiafeniappengeschwulsten. Med Weh 20: 638Google Scholar
  12. Ketz E (1974) Brain tumours and epilepsy. In: Vinken PJ, Brwyn GW (eds) Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Vol. 16. North-Holland Amsterdam, p 254Google Scholar
  13. Leibowitz W, Atler M (1969) Tumours of the nervous system: incidence and population selectivity. Neurology (Minneap) 19: 292Google Scholar
  14. Lund M (1981) Epilepsy in association with intracranial tumour. Acta Psychiat Scand Suppl 81Google Scholar
  15. Maurice-Williams R (1974) Micturition symptoms in frontal lobe tumours. J Neurol Neurosurg Psych 37: 43CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. McKeran RO, Thomas DGT (1980) The clinical study of gliomas. In: Thomas DGT, Graham DI (eds) Brain Tumours: Scientific Basis, Clinical Investigation and Current Therapy. London, Butterworths, pp 194–230Google Scholar
  17. Penfield W, Erikson TC, Tarlov I (1940) Relation of intracranial tumours and symptomatic epilepsy. Arch Neurol Psychiat 44: 300–315Google Scholar
  18. Percy AK, Elvaback LR, Okasaki H, Kurland LT (1972) Neoplasms of the central nervous system: epidemiologic considerations. Neurology (Minneap) 22: 40Google Scholar
  19. Strobos RRJ, Alexander E, Maslund RL (1958) Brain tumour presenting as convulsive disorder. Dis Nerv Syst 19: 518PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Zhu PG (1990) Delayed epileptic seizures in adults. Chung Hua Shen Ching Ching Shen Ko Tsa Chih 23: 286–288Google Scholar
  21. Zulch KJ (1951) Röntgen diagnostik beim cerebralen Anfall. Verh Ditsch Ges Med. 56: 24Google Scholar
  22. Zulch KJ, Borck WF (1965) Tafeln über die relative Häufigkeit der Hirngeschwulste in Verschiedenen Altersklassen. Zentrabi Neurochir 12: 93Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. F. Pell
  • D. G. T. Thomas

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations