Cooperating Agents — A Database Perspective

  • S. M. Deen

Abstract

A Cooperating Knowledge Based System (CKBS) is a collection of autonomous and potentially heterogeneous, objects (or units) which cooperate together in solving problems. An object can be a data/rule base or an agent which can be intelligent or unintelligent. The paper investigates the issues in CKBS from a database perspective, which is distinguished from the AI perspective by its emphasis on a common architecture with well-defined components and interfaces, performance efficiency and concurrency/reliability/recovery. The paper describes a generic object model, and also a hybrid cooperation model which incorporates the blackboard approach within the framework of a distributed transaction. The object model has a layered structure, complete with the necessary software components for run-time execution. The hybrid cooperation model is claimed to reduce unnecessary communications, while retaining the effectiveness of a blackboard approach. Three exploratory applications — travel planning, image recognition and air-traffic control — have been used to illustrate this approach.

The concepts presented in this paper are being further developed in the COSMOS project, in which a number of British Universities and Polytechnics, collaborate.

Keywords

Europe Radar Coherence Assure Encapsulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Deen
    • 1
  1. 1.DAKE CentreUniversity of KeeleEngland

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