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Knee Biomechanics and Materials

  • Malcolm H. Pope
  • Braden C. Fleming

Abstract

“Biomechanics is the study of forces and the effects that these forces have on the human body” (LeVeau 1984). From the orthopaedist’s perspective, there is a normal equilibrium between mechanical stress on the musculoskeletal system and its response to that stress. Any disturbance to this balance will eventually result in remodeling, degeneration, or failure of a structure. Within the realm of total knee replacement, it is necessary to understand fully the biomechanics of the normal joint since the objective of total knee arthroplasty is to re-establish normal joint function.

Keywords

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Total Knee Arthroplasty Knee Joint Tibial Plateau Total Knee Replacement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm H. Pope
  • Braden C. Fleming

There are no affiliations available

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