Micturition pp 225-246 | Cite as

Which Operation and for Which Patient?

  • P. Hilton

Abstract

The earliest documented surgical approach to the problem of stress incontinence was that of Baker-Brown [1] in 1864, and since his description of suprapubic cystostomy procedure over 150 different operations have been devised for the treatment of this condition. Views regarding the pathophysiology of genuine stress incontinence have evolved considerably in this time, and much has been said of this in earlier chapters. Nevertheless, the large number of operations available reflects our continuing uncertainties over this condition and the likely mechanism of its cure, and also the inadequacy of any current procedure to deal satisfactorily with all cases.

Keywords

Assure Nylon Polypropylene Kelly Dura 

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© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Hilton

There are no affiliations available

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