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Making a Mind Versus Modelling the Brain: Artificial Intelligence Back at the Branchpoint

  • Hubert L. Dreyfus
  • Stuart E. Dreyfus
Chapter
Part of the Artificial Intelligence and Society book series (HCS)

Abstract

In the early 1950s, as calculating machines were coming into their own, a few pioneer thinkers began to realise that digital computers could be more than number-crunchers. At that point two opposed visions of what computers could be, each with its correlated research programme, emerged and struggled for recognition. One faction saw computers as a system for manipulating mental symbols; the other, as a medium for modelling the brain. One sought to use computers to instantiate a formal representation of the world; the other, to simulate the interactions of neurons. One took problem solving as its paradigm of intelligence; the other, learning. One utilised logic; the other, statistics. One school was the heir to the rationalist, reductionist tradition in philosophy; the other viewed itself as idealised, holistic neuroscience.

Keywords

Hide Node Symbolic Representation Intelligent Behaviour Cognitive Science Society Everyday World 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hubert L. Dreyfus
  • Stuart E. Dreyfus

There are no affiliations available

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