The Viscoplastic Approach for the Finite-Element Modelling of Metal-Forming Processes

  • J.-L. Chenot
  • M. Bellet

Abstract

There is a growing interest in industry in the use of numerical models for the simulation of industrial forming processes. These models allow the prediction of different parameters, which are of extreme importance for the design of the optimized forming sequence:

  • Final shape of the part

  • Loads on the machine and the tools

  • Local deformations in the part

  • Temperature in the tool and in the part

  • Tool wear

  • Evolution of the physical structure of the part after the deformation and temperature history

Keywords

Titanium Anisotropy Convection Compaction Compressibility 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.-L. Chenot
  • M. Bellet

There are no affiliations available

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