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Computer Modelling Experiments

  • David M. W. Powers
  • Christopher C. R. Turk

Abstract

This chapter presents the experimental framework and research which the authors have pursued to explore the theory and methodology outlined in the preceding chapters. It is deemed essential that language be presented in a full context so that the interhierarchical relationships can be learnt, and can provide cues for intrahierarchical learning. The ideal compromise for this work is a toy world in which the learner can act and be acted upon. It can then learn language in a rich context which avoids the need for the experimenter to laboriously construct semantic sequences to accompany text, and obviates the need for full pattern recognition and robotic dexterity in the prototype.

Keywords

Machine Learn Logic Program Parse Tree Grammar Rule Ontology Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. W. Powers
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Christopher C. R. Turk
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.FB InformatikUniversity of KaiserslauternPetershamAustralia
  2. 2.Honorary Associate in Computing, MPCEMacquarie UniversityPetershamAustralia
  3. 3.IMPACT LtdPetershamAustralia
  4. 4.‘Bentwys’, Llanbair DiscoedChepstow, GwentUK
  5. 5.College of CardiffUniversity of WalesUK

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