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Dietary Carbohydrate and Dental Caries

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Abstract

In a balanced diet those components which may affect dental caries will be used judiciously, so that any enhancement of the dental caries process is controlled. It is now well known that not all individuals are susceptible to dental decay to the same degree, so the use of dietary carbohydrate will not bring about the same prevalence of decay in all people. Any fermentable carbohydrate used frequently will encourage dental caries in some caries-prone subjects; however, other individuals will experience no decay despite the use of highly cariogenic foods.

Keywords

  • Dental Caries
  • Dietary Carbohydrate
  • Sugar Consumption
  • Snack Food
  • Breakfast Cereal

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Curzon, M.E.J. (1988). Dietary Carbohydrate and Dental Caries. In: Dobbing, J. (eds) A Balanced Diet?. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-1652-3_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-1652-3_4

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