Growth Factors

  • Ian J. Forbes
  • Anthony S-Y. Leong

Abstract

Growth factors are proteins which are essential for the growth of normal cells. They act at extraordinarily low concentrations, inducing cells to proceed from the resting phase, G0, through the cell cycle, by binding to specific high-affinity receptors. They induce a series of metabolic events which lead to expression of specific genes whose products are necessary for each stage of the growth cycle. The group of genes which are involved in growth include the known oncogenes. At least one growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and several receptors for growth factors are the products of proto-oncogenes. Known chromosomal locations of some of the genes for growth factors are set out in Table 2.1 (see p. 13). Growth factors are also involved in differentiation, although less is known about this aspect of their action. Activation of some oncogenes, for example c-fos, leads to proliferation in some cells and to differentiation in others.

Keywords

Testosterone Polypeptide Interferon Prostaglandin Progesterone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian J. Forbes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anthony S-Y. Leong
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.University of AdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.The Queen Elizabeth HospitalWoodvilleAustralia
  3. 3.Institute of Medical and Veterinary ScienceAdelaideAustralia
  4. 4.Department of PathologyUniversity of AdelaideAustralia

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