Haemorrhage and How To Cope

  • John Dormandy

Abstract

Although we may be loathe to admit it, by far the commonest cause of unexpected haemorrhage is a technical error on the part of the operating surgeon. Failure to detect or treat adequately an abnormality in the patient’s own haemostatic mechanisms is an exceedingly rare cause by comparison. The three golden rules for avoiding damage to vessels during operation are:
  1. 1.

    Know the anatomy.

     
  2. 2.

    Be aware of the danger areas and carefully identify all the important structures before proceeding further.

     
  3. 3.

    Follow meticulous techniques for dealing with minor and expected bleeding.

     

Keywords

Cellulose Toxicity Catheter Hepatitis Europe 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Dormandy

There are no affiliations available

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