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Reactions to Dipterous Biting Flies

  • John O’Donel Alexander

Abstract

The blood-sucking dipterous flies are composed of several distinct families, which are shown in Table 9.1. The common feature of this group is the requirement of a blood meal for the proper development of eggs and their deposition. The biting techniques vary with the different species. Their mouthparts are developed accordingly and are depicted for some species in Fig. 9.1.

Keywords

Visceral Leishmaniasis Blood Meal British Museum Medical Importance Yellow Fever Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • John O’Donel Alexander
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlasgowUK

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