Advertisement

Testis and Testicular Semen

  • Thaddeus Mann
  • Cecilia Lutwak-Mann

Abstract

One can accept Brown-Séquard’s assertion without reservations and agree that practically every organ and function in the male body is in one way or another ruled by influences emanating from the testis. By virtue of its exocrine and endocrine activity the male gonad determines nearly every aspect of what in common parlance is called ‘maleness’, a concept that covers a host of biological, physical, mental and behavioural attributes and aptitudes of the male sex. It is still a moot point (for want of experimental data) which of the two above-mentioned major testicular functions may rightfully aspire to the designation of being ‘noble’ as opposed to being merely ‘useful’. Insofar as the formation of semen is concerned, both are essential in that the exocrine activity of the testis ensures the production of spermatozoa in the seminiferous tubules, whereas the endocrine activity, as well as impinging upon spermatogenesis, stimulates the secretory capacity of the male accessory glands, thereby regulating the output of seminal plasma. What could not have been foreseen in those uncomplicated, far-off times, however, is that the apparent hegemony of the testis would in due course be effectively challenged, with the result that the testicular contribution to maleness must now be viewed in the context of an intricate control and feedback system, centering in the brain and governed by the hypophysis and the hypothalamus.

Keywords

Sertoli Cell Leydig Cell Seminiferous Tubule Seminiferous Epithelium Testicular Spermatozoon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thaddeus Mann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cecilia Lutwak-Mann
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Endocrinology and Reproduction Research BranchNational Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Physiology of ReproductionUniversity of CambridgeEngland
  3. 3.Agricultural Research Council Unit of Reproductive Physiology and BiochemistryUniversity of CambridgeEngland

Personalised recommendations