Differential Diagnosis: Other Sclerosing Disorders

  • Peter Beighton
  • Bryan J. Cremin


Osteoblastic secondary neoplastic deposits and lymphomas may produce diffuse or localised areas of skeletal sclerosis. In practice, their clinical and radiological features are unlikely to be mistaken for those of the dysplasias described in the preceding chapters. There exists, however, a residue of conditions which may cause confusion, and a brief description of these is given in this chapter.


Tuberous Sclerosis Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Renal Tubular Acidosis Renal Osteodystrophy Preceding Chapter 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Beighton
    • 1
  • Bryan J. Cremin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Genetics, Medical School and Groote Schuur HospitalUniversity of Cape TownSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Groote Schuur and Red Cross Children’s HospitalUniversity of Cape TownSouth Africa

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