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Risk-related treatment strategies for diffuse large B cell lymphoma

  • B. Coiffier

Abstract

Patients with large cell lymphoma have differing prognoses. Even within a single histologic subtype, outcome is influenced by a number of factors (not all of which are recognized), and the optimal treatment differs from one patient to another.

Keywords

Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation Adverse Prognostic Factor Aggressive Lymphoma Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma Lymphoma Prognostic Factor Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Diviné M, Lepage E, Brière J et al. Is the small non-cleaved-cell lymphoma histologic subtype a poor prognostic factor in adult patients? A case-controlled analysis. Groupe d’Etude des Lymphomes de l’Adulte. J Clin Oncol 1996; 14:240–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Haioun C, Lepage E, Gisselbrecht C et al. Benefit of autologous bone marrow transplantation over sequential chemotherapy in poor-risk aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: updated results of the prospective study LNH87–2. Groupe d’Etude des Lymphomes de l’Adulte. J Clin Oncol 1997; 15:1131–7.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Miller TP, Dahlberg S, Cassady JR et al. Chemotherapy alone compared with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for localized intermediate- and high-grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med 1998; 339: 21–6.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. The International Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Prognostic Factors Project. A predictive model for aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. N Engl J Med 1993; 329: 987–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. The Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Classification Project. A clinical evaluation of the International Lymphoma Study Group classification of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Blood 1997; 89: 3909–18.Google Scholar
  6. The Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Classification Project. Effect of age on the characteristics and clinical behavior of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. Ann Oncol 1997; 8: 973–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Tilly H, Gaulard P, Lepage E et al. Primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in adults: clinical presentation, immuno-phenotype, and outcome. Blood 1997; 90: 3727–34.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Coiffier

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