Societies, Journals, and Books

  • Arthur Hollman

Abstract

Modern British cardiology had started well before the 20th century began in 1901. In the previous 20 years, Walter H Gaskell had elucidated the physiology of cardiac contraction, T Lauder Brunton had completed elegant work on the pharmacology of the heart, Augustus Waller had recorded the first human electrocardiogram, and Byrom Bramwell had written a comprehensive textbook on diseases of the heart. Even so, 1901 was, in fact, an important year because Dr James Mackenzie was writing his internationally acclaimed book, The study of the pulse, arterial venous and hepatic, and the movements of the heart. Mackenzie’s work and his original views on cardiac disease attracted many physicians to his general practice in Burnley, Lancashire. They would meet on Sunday afternoons to see patients and discuss polygraph tracings, and Mackenzie suggested that a small club should be formed for meetings and discussion.[1] [2] This was the first time that an organised cardiac group had been considered, but with Mackenzie’s move to London in 1907 the idea was dropped.

Keywords

Catheter Europe Pneumonia Century Influenza Income 

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Notes and references

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur Hollman

There are no affiliations available

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