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Metastatic Rectal Cancer

  • K. Sumpter
  • D. Cunningham

Abstract

Carcinomas of the rectum are defined anatomically as tumours arising in the distal 15 cm of the large bowel. The rectum lies below the peritoneal reflection, hence, unlike colonic carcinomas, the growth of rectal tumours is not limited by the serosa. At presentation, 50% of patients with rectal carcinoma are considered to be operable; of these, 50% will have a curative resection. The likelihood of developing local recurrence or metastatic disease after curative surgery increases with Dukes’ stage from A to C and with the extent of tumour penetration of the bowel, Gunderson and Sosin Stage 1–3. The 5-year survival rates for patients with rectal carcinoma according to Dukes’ stage are as follows: Dukes’ A 80%, Dukes’ B 55% and Dukes’ C 32%. The management of locally recurrent rectal cancer depends upon its extent and whether it is amenable to curative treatment. Ultimately, 25% of patients with B2 disease and 50% of patients with C disease develop local recurrence.

Keywords

Colorectal Cancer Clin Oncol Maximum Tolerate Dose Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Advanced Colorectal Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Sumpter
  • D. Cunningham

There are no affiliations available

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