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Studying Networked Learning: Some Implications from Socially Situated Learning Theory and Actor Network Theory

  • Steve Fox
Part of the Computer Supported Cooperative Work book series (CSCW)

Abstract

In this paper, I want to discuss networked learning (NL) in the light of actor network theory (ANT) and related social theories of learning and knowing. For many, the term NL implies innovative, and therefore probably better, forms of educational learning process, as the subtitle to a recent conference makes clear: “Networked Learning 2000: Innovative Approaches to Lifelong Learning and Higher Education Through the Internet” (Asensio et al., 2000). Through the discussion in this chapter, I wish to problematize the notion of networked learning, both in terms of what is meant by ‘learning’ and what is meant by ‘networked.’

Keywords

Lifelong Learn Network Learning Critical Pedagogy Actor Network Theory Printing Press 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Fox

There are no affiliations available

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