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Guidelines for the Design of Haptic Widgets

  • Ian Oakley
  • Alison Adams
  • Stephen Brewster
  • Philip Gray

Abstract

Haptic feedback has been shown to improve user performance in Graphical User Interface (GUI) targeting tasks in a number of studies. These studies have typically focused on interactions with individual targets, and it is unclear whether the performance increases reported will generalise to the more realistic situation where multiple targets are presented simultaneously. This paper addresses this issue in two ways. Firstly two empirical studies dealing with groups of haptically augmented widgets are presented. These reveal that haptic augmentations of complex widgets can reduce performance, although carefully designed feedback can result in performance improvements. The results of these studies are then used in conjunction with the previous literature to generate general design guidelines for the creation of haptic widgets.

Keywords

haptic desktop GUI multi-target design guidelines 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Oakley
    • 1
  • Alison Adams
    • 1
  • Stephen Brewster
    • 1
  • Philip Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.Glasgow Interactive Systems Group, Department of Computing ScienceUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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