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The Roots of Computer Supported Argument Visualization

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Part of the Computer Supported Cooperative Work book series (CSCW)

Abstract

This chapter considers some of the “roots” to Computer-Supported Argument Visualization (CSAV). The definitions above point to historical ancestors and conceptual foundations, and this chapter seeks to identify the most influential work to whom CSAV owes an intellectual debt. Specifically, we will consider individuals who invented paper-based precursors of argument maps, and/or who envisioned the possibilities that computers opened up. In mapping CSAV’s intellectual terrain, I may well omit important branches to its roots that I have not encountered, but hope that this chapter will serve to stimulate the forging of further connections to other traditions.

Keywords

  • Wicked Problem
  • Argument Mapping
  • Knowledge Forum
  • Code Space
  • Diagrammatic Reasoning

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Buckingham Shum, S. (2003). The Roots of Computer Supported Argument Visualization. In: Kirschner, P.A., Buckingham Shum, S.J., Carr, C.S. (eds) Visualizing Argumentation. Computer Supported Cooperative Work. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-0037-9_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-0037-9_1

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