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Classical Helium Fluid Mechanics

  • Steven W. Van Sciver
Chapter
Part of the International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

In many applications of cryogenics, cooling is best achieved by confining the coolant to a tube or duct and circulating it through the system in a closed loop. In this configuration, the fluid that circulates through the system may be a single phase liquid, single phase gas or a two – phase flow of liquid and vapor. The principal variables in a single phase system are the pressure, temperature and mass flow rate. In two phase flows, additional variables are needed to characterize the state and dynamics. From the engineering point of view, the main quantity of interest is the pressure drop caused by the flowing fluid. In Chap. 5, we will consider the heat transfer issues associated with flowing normal helium.

Keywords

Pressure Drop Mass Flow Rate Friction Factor Void Fraction Heat Load 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Readings

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  2. B. R. Munson, D. F. Young and T. H. Okiishi, Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics 2 nd Ed.,Wiley, New York, 1994.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. P. B. Whalley, Two Phase Flow and Heat Transfer, Oxford Science, Oxford, 1996.Google Scholar
  4. W. M. Kays and A. L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers 3 rd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1984.Google Scholar
  5. M. Kavainy, Principles of Heat Transfer in Porous Media, Springer – Verlag, New York, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Field LaboratoryFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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