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Modeling the Impact of Interventions on Local Indicators of Offending, Victimization, and Incarceration

  • Rolf Loeber
  • Rebecca Stallings
Chapter
Part of the Longitudinal Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Series book series (LRSB)

Abstract

In Chap. 8 we laid out the rationale behind simulation (modeling) studies to ascertain the impact of interventions on reducing violence, particularly the national homicide rates in a cohort of males aged 18 in 2000. The interventions considered were nurse home visiting, a preschool intellectual enrichment program, and multisystemic therapy. In contrast with Chap. 8 that dealt with the impact of preventive interventions on the national homicide rate, this chapter deals with the impact of preventive and remedial interventions on local indicators of offending and victimization in the PYS (homicide offenders, homicide victims, arrests for violence, serious delinquency, and incarceration of offenders).

Keywords

Young Cohort Violent Offender Court Record Allegheny County Homicide Victim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Free UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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