Sleep Preoccupation Scale (SPS)

  • Azmeh Shahid
  • Kate Wilkinson
  • Shai Marcu
  • Colin M. Shapiro
Chapter

Abstract

A 22-item, self-report scale, the SPS was designed to assess daytime cognitions in patients with insomnia. Though researchers have frequently focused on nighttime thoughts and preoccupations when attempting to treat disordered sleep, a growing body of research suggests that daytime beliefs about sleep may be just as significant in the experience of insomnia [1]. SPS items evaluate two distinct domains: the cognitive and behavioral consequences of poor sleep (e.g., negative thoughts and perceptions), and the affective consequences (e.g., worry and distress). The tool may be particularly useful for clinicians attempting to identify and treat the origins of sleep issues in their patients.

References

  1. 1.
    Harvey, A. G. (2002). A cognitive model of insomnia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 40, 869–893.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ellis, J., Mitchell, K., & Hogh, H. (2007). Sleep preoccupation in poor sleepers: psychometric properties of the sleep preoccupation scale. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 63(6), 579–585.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Representative Studies Using Scale

  1. Ellis, J., Hampson, S. E., & Cropsley, M. (2007). The role of preoccupation in attributions for poor sleep. Sleep Medicine, 8(3), 277–280.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Azmeh Shahid
    • 1
  • Kate Wilkinson
    • 1
  • Shai Marcu
    • 2
  • Colin M. Shapiro
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada
  2. 2.University of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Toronto The Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep CentreTorontoCanada

Personalised recommendations