Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) Solutions Using Remendable Polymers

  • Terrisa Duenas
  • Jennifer Schlitter
  • Naida Lacevic
  • Akhilesh Jha
  • Karen Chai
  • Fred Wudl
  • Lucas Westcott-Baker
  • Ajit Mal
  • Aaron Corder
  • Teng K. Ooi
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

This work describes the cross-cutting technology for using remendable polymers for Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) Interceptors to heal damaged missile structures. Matrix cracking and associated delamination of carbon-fiber ply skins on interceptor structures is addressed using a Mendomer-based polymer composite developed by the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), NextGen Aeronautics, US Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Missile Defense Agency (MDA) scientists and engineers. When used in place of conventional composite matrix materials, this material system enables in-situ healing of damaged carbon-fiber components. Both neat and composite samples were fabricated and examined for their remendable and shape memory properties. The neat polymer samples and polymer/Ni particle composites contained a significant number of voids. The carbon-fiber-polymer composite samples exhibit similar gas entrapment as well as inadequate carbonfiber wet-out during fabrication. Despite the undesirable void content and inadequate carbon-fiber wet-out, the coupons exhibit appreciable remendable and shape memory properties. Further improvement and optimization of the composite layup process are needed to produce remendable carbon-fiber composites with adequate mechanical and structural properties. We also present preliminary molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element analysis (FEA) simulations to capture the behavior of these remendable material systems.

Keywords

Nickel Mold Epoxy Brittle Smoke 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terrisa Duenas
    • 1
  • Jennifer Schlitter
    • 2
  • Naida Lacevic
    • 2
  • Akhilesh Jha
    • 2
  • Karen Chai
    • 2
  • Fred Wudl
    • 3
  • Lucas Westcott-Baker
    • 3
  • Ajit Mal
    • 4
  • Aaron Corder
    • 5
  • Teng K. Ooi
    • 5
  1. 1.NextGen Aeronautics, Inc.TorranceUSA
  2. 2.NextGen Aeronautics, Inc.TorranceUSA
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA
  4. 4.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Missile Defense Agency, Pentagon DefenseHuntsvilleUSA

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