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Women and Climate Change: Vulnerabilities and Challenges

  • Anita L. WendenEmail author
Chapter
  • 1.9k Downloads
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

This chapter aims to illustrate how socially constructed gender roles contribute to the vulnerability of women to climate change, mainly those 70% who constitute the world’s poor, and then to consider how adapting to climate change challenges women to take leadership in their communities, thus contributing to the realigning of relationships of inequality.

Keywords

Leadership Vulnerability Human rights 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Earth and Peace Education International (EPE)Rego ParkUSA
  2. 2.NGO/CSW Subcommittee on Women and Climate ChangeNew YorkUSA

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