Conducting Information Systems Research Using Narrative Inquiry

Chapter
Part of the Integrated Series in Information Systems book series (ISIS, volume 29)

Abstract

This chapter places Narrative Inquiry in the theoretical context of Grounded Theory. To begin, Grounded Theory is explained along with the concept of Grounded Theory Method, which employs the constant comparison of data obtained through qualitative interviews. Then Narrative Inquiry, within this ­context, is introduced and explained. The discussion leads to the necessity to adopt an interview technique within the Narrative Inquiry approach to gather interview data. Thus, a more specific technique is described known as the Long Interview Technique. This technique further requires the development of an interview guide specifically related to an individual project. This guide is referred to as an interview protocol. While the interview protocol must be developed to allow flexibility within the interview and reduce researcher bias, it must also support a consistent approach to conducting a number of interviews to gather data related to the research question. This overall approach is related to conducting research in general and more specifically information systems research. Recent information systems research investigations are presented.

Keywords

Grounded Theory Method Narrative Inquiry Long Interview Technique Interview protocol 

Abbreviations

CIO

Chief Information Officer

CEO

Chief Executive Officer

CTO

Chief Technology Officer

IS

Information Systems

HRM

Human Resource Management

URL

Universal Resource Locator

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of LethbridgeLethbridgeCanada

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