Higher Cortical Functions

Chapter

Abstract

It is well to warn the student beginning the study of language function prior to the development of modern Neuroimaging this had been an area of much confusion, with much disagreement and multiple hypotheses. This discussion will be limited to the more practical problems of anatomical localization.

Keywords

Fatigue Selenium Dexamethasone Convolution Pyramid 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anatomy and Cellular Biology Fulbright ScholarTufts University Health Sciences SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.NeurologyUniversity of Massachusetts School of MedicineWorcesterUSA

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